BEYOND ALL BARRIERS Book - the Perfect Christmas Gift



Looking for a great gift idea for your loved ones this Christmas? Why not an inspirational book for a change??

Mombisyosa recommends "Beyond All Barriers". The book is a compilation of 100 inspiring stories of people from all walks of life. It is the fifth installment of the successful series Coincidence or Miracle?

The book is about everyday miracles told by people who want to share their stories. Whatever their stature, position, economic class, or origin, one thing is clear: God cares for them all. Among the storytellers is Alden Richards (a.k.a. Richard Reyes Faulkerson, Jr.), who is currently celebrating his newfound A-list celebrity status, thanks to his Eat Bulaga Kalyeserye stint and his (now) millions of AlDub (Alden and Yaya Dub) fans. Kuya Kim Atienza is also in the book and so are other well known personlaities such as Ombudswoman Conchita Carpio Morales, Jun Palafox, GMA7 Chairman Felipe Gozon and others.

The authors of “Beyond All Barriers,” Coincidence or Miracle? V are big names in their fields. Flor Tarriela is chair of Philippine National Bank, and a former Undersecretary of Finance, and holds the distinction of being the first female president of Citibank N.A. Butch G. Jimenez is a senior vice president of PLDT. He is the producer of the award-winning and critically acclaimed movies Jose Rizal and Muro- Ami. He was awarded one of Ten Outstanding Young Men, and Ten Outstanding Young Persons of the World. He was also awarded the Agora Market Man of the Year in 2006.

As you read through the stories,you would realize how much God cares for you too. He may not orchestrate His answer the way you want it to be, but rest assured, God always knows what's best.

Please check out the ff. articles on the book:
By Domini Torrevillas (the book editor) 
By Nickky Faustine P. de Guzman (blog)
By Marivic Rufino (BW online article)

The book is now available online thru BLINK Order your copies now!


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WHY EAT FRUITS - A USEFUL INFOGRAPHIC

WORRY IMPLIES SOMETHING

worry-means-we-dont-trust-god-enough


Worry implies that we don't quite trust that God is big enough, powerful enough, or loving enough to take care of what's happening in our lives.

There is this powerful truth that asks, "Why worry when we can pray?"



50 BEST THINGS ABOUT PINOYS

Found this in an old email.  Filipinos are indeed one of a kind.

Filipinos are generally cheerful people. We always have funny ideas and stories about life, love, work and leisure. Life is lifeless, love is loveless, work is dull, leisure is non-relaxing and getting together with people becomes boring if there is no funny story-telling and jokes. Everything under the sun when treated with Pinoy humor can bring smile and laughter!


FROM the 1896 Revolution to the first Philippine Republic, the Commonwealth period, the EDSA Revolt, and the tiger cub economy... history marches on.

Thankfully, however, some things never change. Like the classics, things irresistibly Pinoy or Filipino mark us for life. They’re the indelible stamp of our identity, the undeniable affinity that binds us like twins.

These things celebrate the good in us, the best of our culture and the infinite possibilities we are all capable of. Some are so self-explanatory you only need mention them for fellow Filipinos or Pinoys to swoon or drool.

Here, from all over this crazed country (but beloved nation for patriotic Pinoys like us) and in no particular order, are fifty (50) best things that make us unmistakably Pinoy.

1. Merienda. Where else is it normal to eat snack five times a day?
2. Sawsawan. Assorted sauces that guarantee freedom of choice, enough room for experimentation and maximum tolerance for diverse tastes. Favorites: toyo’t calamansi, suka at sili, patis.3. Kuwan, ano. At a loss for words? Try these and marvel at how Pinoys understand exactly what do you want or mean.
4. Pinoy humor and irreverence. If you’re desperate or unlucky and you know it, crack a joke. Nothing personal, really.

5. Tingi. Thank goodness for retails of small entrepreneurs. Where else can we buy cigarettes, soap, condiments and life’s essentials in small affordable amounts?
6. Spirituality. Even before the Spaniards came, our ethnic tribes had their own anitos, bathalas and assorted deities, pointing to a strong relationship with the Creator, who or whatever it may be.
7. Po, opo, mano po. Speech suffixes that define courtesy, deference, filial respect–a balm to the spirit in these aggressive times.
8. Pasalubong. Our way of sharing the vicarious thrills and delights of a trip, and a wonderful excuse to shop for presents without the customary guilt.
9. Beaches! With 7,000 plus islands, we have miles and miles of shoreline piled high with fine white sand, lapped by warm waters, and nibbled by exotic tropical fish. From the stormy seas of Batanes to the emerald isles of Palawan–over here, life is truly a beach.
10. Bagoong. Darkly mysterious, this smelly fish or shrimp paste typifies the underlying theme of most ethnic foods: disgustingly unhygienic, unbearably stinky and simply irresistible.

bagoong

11. Bayanihan. Yes, the internationally-renowned dance company, but also this habit of pitching in still common in small communities. Just have that cold beer and some pulutan ready for the troops.
12. Balikbayan box. Another way of sharing life’s bounty, no matter if it seems like we’re fleeing Pol Pot every time we head home from anywhere in the globe. The most wonderful part is that, more often than not, the contents are carted home to be distributed.
13. Pilipino komiks. Not to mention “Hiwaga,” “Aliwan,” “Tagalog Classics,” “Liwayway” and”Bulaklak” magazines. Pulpy publications that gave us Darna, Facifica Falayfay, Lagalag, Kulafu, Kenkoy, Dyesebel and Captain Barbel characters of a time both innocent and worldly.
14. Folk songs. They come unbidden and spring, full blown, like a second language, at the slightest nudge from the too-loud stereo of a passing jeepney or tricycle.
15. Fiesta. Eat, drink and be merry, for tomorrow is just another day, shrugs the poor man who, once a year, honors a patron saint with this sumptuous, no-holds-barred spread. It’s a Pinoy celebration at its pious and riotous best.
16. Aswang, manananggal, kapre. The whole underworld of Filipino lower mythology recalls our uniquely bizarre childhood, that is, before political correctness kicked in. Still, their rich adventures pepper our storytelling.
17. Jeepneys. Colorful, fast, reckless, a vehicle of postwar Pinoy ingenuity, this Everyman’s communal cadillac makes for a cheap, interesting ride. If the driver’s a daredevil (as they usually are), hang on to your seat.
18. Dinuguan. Blood stew, a bloodcurdling idea, until you try it with puto. Best when mined with chilis and peppers. Messy but delicious.
19. Santacruzan. More than just a beauty contest, this one has religious overtones, a tableau of St. Helena’s and Constantine ’s search for the Cross that seamlessly blends piety, pageantry and ritual. Plus, it’s the perfect excuse to show off the prettiest ladies–and the most beautiful gowns.
20. Balut. Unhatched duck’s embryo, another unspeakable ethnic food to outsiders, but oh, to indulge in guilty pleasures! Sprinkle some salt and suck out that soup, with gusto.

balut

21. Pakidala. A personalized door-to-door remittance and delivery system for overseas Filipino workers who don’t trust the banking system, and who expect a family update from the courier, as well.
22. Choc-nut. Crumbly peanut chocolate bars that defined childhood ecstasy before M & M’s and Hershey’s.
23. Kamayan style. To eat with one’s hand and eschew spoon, fork and table manners–ah, heaven.
24. Chicharon. Pork, fish or chicken crackling. There is in the crunch a hint of the extravagant, the decadent and the pedestrian. Perfect with vinegar, sublime with beer.
25. Pinoy hospitality. Just about everyone gets a hearty “Kain tayo!” invitation to break bread with whoever has food to share, no matter how skimpy or austere it is.
26. Adobo, kare-kare, sinigang and other lutong bahay stuff. Home-cooked meals that have the stamp of approval from several generations, who swear by closely-guarded cooking secrets and family recipes.
27. Lola Basyang. The voice one heard spinning tales over the radio, before movies and television curtailed imagination and defined grown-up tastes.
28. Pambahay. Home is where one can let it all hang out, where clothes do not make a man or woman but rather define their level of comfort.
29. Tricycle and trisikad, the poor Pinoy’s taxicab that delivers you at your doorstep for as little as five (5) pesos, with a complimentary dusting of polluted air.
30. Dirty ice cream. Very Pinoy flavors that make up for the risk: munggo, langka, ube, mais, keso, macapuno. Plus there’s the colorful cart that recalls jeepney art and of course Mamang sorbetero.



31. Yayas. The trusted Filipino nanny who, ironically, has become a major Philippine export as overseas contract workers. A good one is almost like a surrogate parent–if you don’t mind the accent and the predilection for afternoon soap and movie stars.
32. Sarsi. Pinoy rootbeer, the enduring taste of childhood. Our grandfathers had them with an egg beaten in.
33. Pinoy fruits. Atis, guyabano, chesa, mabolo, lanzones, durian, langka, makopa, dalanghita, siniguelas, suha, chico , papaya, singkamas – the possibilities!
34. Filipino celebrities. Movie stars, broadcasters, beauty queens, public officials, all-around controversial figures: Erap, Cory Aquino, Fidel V. Ramos, GMA, Sharon Cuneta, Vilma Santos, Tiya Dely, Mel and Joey, Pops and Martin, Gary V., etc.
35. World class Pinoys who put us on the global map: Lea Salonga, Manny Pacquiao, Charice Pempengco, Paeng Nepomuceno, Eugene Torre, Luisito Espinosa, Lydia de Vega-Mercado, Jocelyn Enriquez, Elma Muros, Onyok Velasco, Efren “Bata” Reyes, Lilia Calderon-Clemente, Loida Nicolas-Lewis, Josie Natori.
36. Pinoy tastes. A dietitian’s nightmare: too sweet, too salty, too fatty, as in burong talangka, itlog na maalat, crab fat (aligue), bokayo, kutchinta, sapin-sapin, halo-halo, pastilyas, palitaw, pulburon, longganisa, tuyo, ensaymada, ube haleya, sweetened macapuno and garbanzos. Remember, we’re the guys who put sugar in our spaghetti sauce. Yum!
37. The sights. Banaue Rice Terraces, Boracay, Bohol’s Chocolate Hills, Corregidor Island, Fort Santiago, the Hundred Islands, the Las Pinas Bamboo Organ, Rizal Park, Mt. Banahaw, Mayon Volcano, Taal Volcano. A land of contrasts and ever-changing landscapes.
38. Gayuma, agimat and anting-anting. Love potions and amulets. How the socially-disadvantaged Pinoy copes.
39. Barangay Ginebra. Jaworski, PBA, MBA and basketball. How the verticaly-challenged Pinoy compensates, via a national sports obsession that reduces fans to tears and fistfights.
40. People Power. When everyone became a hero at EDSA and changed Philippine history overnight.
41. Sing-a-long or videoke. This is a clear proof of the Filipino's love for music. Everywhere you go, may it be in bars, in small restaurants or even in carnivals, you'll always find a sing-a-long machine (which can be considered as the modern version of juke box stations). Just drop a coin or two and pronto!!! - you'll hear the latest songs on play.
42. Resiliency. We’ve survived 400 years of Spanish rule, the US bases, Marcos, the 1990 earthquake, lahar, lambada and Tamagochi. We’ll survive GMA.
43. Yoyo. Truly Filipino in origin, this hunting tool, weapon, toy and merchandising vehicle remains the best way to “walk the dog” and “rock the baby,” using just a piece of string.
44. Pinoy Games: Pabitin, palosebo, basagan ng palayok. A few basic rules make individual cunning and persistence a premium, and guarantee a good time for all.
45. Ninoy Aquino. For saying that “the Filipino is worth dying for,'’ and proving it.
46. Balagtasan. The verbal joust that brings out rhyme, reason and passion on a public stage.
47. Tabo. All-powerful, ever-useful, hygienically-triumphant device to scoop water out of a bucket and help the true Pinoy answer nature’s call. Helps maintain our famously stringent toilet habits.

mombisyosa-tabo

48. Pandesal. Despite its shrinking size, still a good buy. Goes well with any filling, best when hot.
49. Jollibee. Truly Pinoy in taste and sensibility, and a corporate icon that we can be quite proud of. Do you know that it has invaded the Middle East, as well?
50. Christmas season. We are the folks to observe the longest Christmas season. And why not? The spirit of giving and sharing is in our hearts.

If you are a true-blue Pinoy, what can you contribute to this list?


Acknowledgment: E-mails from friends / Internet jokes / Google photos



SEPTEMBER 1 POST: A CHRISTMAS SHOPPING TIP

It's SEPTEMBER!  Which means we have just "officially" entered the Christmas season here in the Philippines!

As we know, the Christmas celebration in the country is reputedly the longest in the world. Come the first day of September, (when the “ber” months of the calendar starts), some radio stations begin playing Christmas carols and this goes on until Valentines Day. It really is a long stretch!

So as early as now, we can start planning our shopping, beginning with the most popular Christmas shopping place:  DIVISORIA!

And don't blink because Divisoria is now being turned into an international shopping hub by the mayor of the city of Manila.

Rather give us a list of shopping tips,  Mombisyosa is sharing one of the most basic tips to you today which is from a cool site called SOLVED PH

Mombisyosa-divisoria-tip

Can you share some tips on bargain shopping?



THAT ONE TIMELESS POEM: THE DASH

Mombisyosa is sharing today this poem which has been enjoyed by millions around the world.
It is a piece of beauty making us think about how we should all live our lives (similar to the poem
by Michael Josephson called What Will Matter)

The words have changed many lives. They could change yours, too.

the dash image 1

THE DASH

I read of a man who stood to speak
At the funeral of a friend
He referred to the dates on her tombstone
From the beginning to the end

He noted that first came her date of her birth
And spoke the following date with tears,
But he said what mattered most of all
Was the dash between those years

For that dash represents all the time
That she spent alive on earth.
And now only those who loved her
Know what that little line is worth.

For it matters not how much we own;
The cars, the house, the cash,
What matters is how we live and love
And how we spend our dash.

tombstone the dash


So think about this long and hard.
Are there things you’d like to change?
For you never know how much time is left,
That can still be rearranged.

If we could just slow down enough
To consider what’s true and real
And always try to understand
The way other people feel.

And be less quick to anger,
And show appreciation more
And love the people in our lives
Like we’ve never loved before.

If we treat each other with respect,
And more often wear a smile
Remembering that this special dash
Might only last a little while.

So, when your eulogy is being read
With your life’s actions to rehash
Would you be proud of the things they say
About how you spent your dash?


Credits to Linda Ellis.  Please visit her store for great THE DASH products.

the-dash-quote




SOMETHING TO PONDER UPON by George Carlin

George Carlin's wife died early in 2008 and George followed her, dying in July 2008. It is ironic George Carlin - comedian of the 70's and 80's - could write something so very eloquent and so very appropriate. An observation by George Carlin:

The paradox of our time in history is that we have taller buildings but shorter tempers, wider Freeways, but narrower viewpoints. We spend more, but have less, we buy more, but enjoy less. We have bigger houses and smaller families, more conveniences, but less time. We have more degrees but less sense, more knowledge, but less judgment, more experts, yet more problems, more medicine, but less wellness. 



We drink too much, smoke too much, spend too recklessly, laugh too little, drive too fast, get too angry, stay up too late, get up too tired, read too little, watch TV too much, and pray too seldom. We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often.

We've learned how to make a living, but not a life. We've added years to life not life to years. We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbor. We conquered outer space but not inner space. We've done larger things, but not better things. We have multiplied our possessions, but reduced our values. We talk too much, love too seldom, and hate too often.

We've learned how to make a living, but not a life. We've added years to life not life to years. We've been all the way to the moon and back, but have trouble crossing the street to meet a new neighbor. We conquered outer space but not inner space. We've done larger things, but not better things. 



mombisyosa saying 1

We've cleaned up the air, but polluted the soul. We've conquered the atom, but not our prejudice. We write more, but learn less. We plan more, but accomplish less. We've learned to rush, but not to wait. We build more computers to hold more information, to produce more copies than ever, but we communicate less and less. 

These are the times of fast foods and slow digestion, big men and small character, steep profits and shallow relationships. These are the days of two incomes but more divorce, fancier houses, but broken homes. These are days of quick trips, disposable diapers, throwaway morality, one night stands, overweight bodies, and pills that do everything from cheer, to quiet, to kill. It is a time when there is much in the showroom window and nothing in the stockroom. A time when technology can bring this letter to you, and a time when you can choose either to share this insight, or to just hit delete. 



mombisyosa sayings


Remember to spend some time with your loved ones, because they are not going to be around forever.

Remember, say a kind word to someone who looks up to you in awe, because that little person soon will grow up and leave your side. 


- Source Unknown -


FFF: FINDING THE FREEDOM IN FORGIVENESS

Bakit nga kaya ang hirap magpatawad ano?  Kasi tinamaan yung ego mo eh. Kasi inabuso yung tiwala mo eh.  Kasi paulit ulit eh.  Marahil kung perfect (hindi nagkakamali) ang isang tao, baka understandable pa na mahirapan siyang mapatawad, kasi may katwiran siyang mag-isip na "Eh, pwede naman na hindi magkamali eh.  Tulad ko!" ... pero may ganun ba??

Wala!  

Ed Lapiz quote
Forgive and be free

Dami din kaya nating kapalpakan.  Yet the Lord has always been forgiving...

Hindi nga kaya't ganun din dapat tayo sa kapwa?

Meron pa ngang iba, hinihintay pa na dumating yung paghihingalo bago bitawan yung "I forgive you". Bibitawan din pala, bakit hihintayin pa yung last minute?

May kalayaan sa pagpapatawad.  Ang unang lumalaya ay tayo.   

Tama si Ptr. Ed.  Tama si Lord.    





Colossians 3:13
Bear with each other and forgive whatever grievances you may have against one another. Forgive as the Lord forgave you.

TO PEOPLE WHO LIKE US, We Do Not Need to Explain

People often find themselves in conflict with one another because of a breakdown in communication. But come to think of it,  a miscommunication is simply communication that has gone wrong, something that can easily be corrected by merely an explanation .  So why does a relationship get sour because of it?  

This truth resonates with the fact that there must indeed be people who just do not like us that much - because if they do like us, even if we goof it off in our communication, they should be able to understand, give us the benefit of the doubt and choose to believe the best in us.   


mombisyosa explanation
You don't need to explain yourself...